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Curriculum

The knowledge throughout our whole school curriculum is sequenced and mapped deliberately and coherently to ensure that students’ learning becomes more sophisticated every year. 

What we mean by this is that our curriculum is a journey where the beginning, middle and end are just as important as the final sprint. So, what is learned in each year group provides the foundations for what will be learned in future years. We have designed a curriculum which aims high; a challenging curriculum rich in vocabulary and a broad range of subjects, so that progressing through our curriculum means that a student is making progress in their learning. 

We continually work on, and review our curriculum content and delivery, ensuring that we continue to develop our students’ access to knowledge. We leave nothing to chance.

 

Subjects

English

 ‘Reading the right books challenges students and arms them with cultural capital’ (Lemov).

In Reading Reconsidered (Lemov, Driggs and Woolway, 2016), Lemov discusses the decline of the Canon and urges schools to draw up their own list of ‘important’ texts that their students should read.  He urges schools to arm students with cultural capital as it is our duty to enable a student, on hearing a reference to Shakespeare, Dickens or Golding to ‘be able to join the conversation’. He explains that there are aspirational effects of reading texts that are considered ‘great’ - as if a text is difficult then it becomes a ‘hurdle to be overcome by great teaching’ and cites the social critic Matthew Arnold’s belief that more students should be reading ‘the best which has been thought and said in the world’ (Culture and Anarchy 1869).

When choosing the texts, the following has been considered:

Further to this, texts have been chosen because they are:

All schemes will interleave the threshold concepts and the portable knowledge taught in the previous units. Each unit will embed shorter non-fiction (essays/articles/excepts) to both challenge the students and inform them about key topics to enrich their understanding of the key texts. All units will be taught at the same time and our CPD across the year will focus on how it should be taught. This will allow the students (and staff) to have a 'shared discourse' - the idea that part of the value of reading is to be able to read and talk about important books that almost everyone has read (Matthew Arnold). 

In his blog, The essential ingredients of great English teaching (2018), Tharby describes English as an ‘interconnected body of knowledge’ where Key Stage 3 not only introduces students to this ‘strange and beautiful world’ but lays the ‘important foundations for Key Stage 4’ and beyond. He also recommends that schools put the literature at the heart of every lesson and, like Lemov, that all English teaching is supported by ambitious text choices.

Towers curriculum

The units chosen will explicitly teach students the key disciplines that underpin the study of English - literary genre, form, structure and devices.

Year 7: Grammar for writing; multicultural poetry; Novel ‘My Sister Lives on the Mantlepiece’; ‘The Tempest’; ‘Oliver Twist’.

Year 8: Grammar for writing; Children’s Fiction; Novel ‘Private Peaceful’; ‘Romeo and Juliet’; ‘Animal Farm’

Year 9: Grammar for writing; Female Poetry; Short stories; Rhetorical Writing/ non Fiction; 

Year 10: Grammar for writing; Language reading; ‘A Christmas Carol’; ‘Macbeth’; Non fiction writing; Anthology Power and Conflict Poetry

Year 11: Grammar for writing; ‘Lord of the Flies’; Unseen poetry; Interleaved GCSE revision

Geography

The purpose of the Towers School Geography curriculum is to allow all students to understand the physical environments of planet Earth and how humans interact with them. The fundamental underpinning ‘big idea’ (concept) of Geography is Space and Place. 

This holistic context will frame students’ understanding and questions of the Earth’s surface of which they live: the landscape, the oceans, flora and fauna, the atmosphere, global and regional hazards, people, human culture and population, UK settlement and the built environment. 

An understanding of place and space and how these two fit together is fundamental to the study of geography, so the curriculum starts with an intensive and in-depth overarching study of the Earth’s geography. This study will blend the human and physical: for example, students will learn of the major oceans, mountains and rivers, and they will also learn of countries,  cities and geopolitical associations. This study will also blend the local and the global: Students will study the geography of the seven continents but also the geography of Kent, London and the UK. Throughout this study, students will also develop their understanding and ability to use such important geographical tools as maps, compasses, globes, atlases and GIS. This in-depth understanding of space and place will equip students to go on and study the more advanced and specific aspects of human and physical geography. 

Throughout the study students will learn using case studies based on the UK as well as other relevant global examples to further strengthen their newly gained knowledge. All of the later units of study will also serve to reinforce, emphasise and expand the space/place knowledge acquired in this first year. 

In addition to the importance of space and place, each year of the Geography curriculum will seek to introduce important aspects of procedural knowledge. As well as being able to use the spatial tools such as maps and GIS that have already been mentioned, students will also develop their ability to collect data, make hypothesis, analyse data and evaluate its findings. Frequent practise of these methods in different contexts will allow students to master these techniques, as well as deepening their understanding of the material they are studying.

Other geographical ‘big ideas’ (concepts) that KS3 students will engage with are; Earth processes, the Natural environment, the Human environment, Hazards, and Climate change. 

The 6 Geography ‘big ideas’ (concepts) will be prevalent throughout the KS3 curriculum and will be taught through different units of study outlined below. In year 7, after developing their sense of space and place, students will investigate Earth’s oceans. They will study how humans interact with the oceans both positively and negatively. Students will then go on to study two more natural environments; Tropical Rainforests and Deserts. In these two units, like with others in the curriculum, they will be learnt holistically. Students will learn about the physical geography of both environments and the processes involved as well as how humans interact with these environments. Later in the year students will study a unit on development. Here they will learn how and why countries develop differently, the impacts of globalisation and sustainability. To finish year 7, students will focus on the physical geography of the UK and the processes involved in shaping the landscape.

In year 8, the knowledge students obtained in year 7 will be progressed further. Students will study the geography of disease. In this unit they will learn about the spatial distribution, causes, impacts and risks of major diseases. Students will also investigate the potential future impacts these disease could have on humans and the attempts there are to eradicate these diseases. Students will then go on to study tectonics and will develop an understanding of how the Earth’s surface has changed over millions of years, the processes involved in this change and the hazards that these processes bring. Students will learn how humans manage these tectonic hazards in both the developed and developing world. After learning about tectonic processes and hazards, the focus will shift towards Earth’s atmosphere. In this unit, students will learn about the processes that drive the weather and climate, the hazards created because of this and, like with tectonics, how humans manage these hazards. Students will study one of humankind’s greatest challenges; global warming and climate change. Before learning about the current issues relating to climate change, students need to understand Earth’s past climate and the natural causes of climate change. They will learn about the impacts because of a changing climate and how humans are exacerbating the problems faced today. Once this is understood then students will learn about the potential future outcomes of climate change and how humans plan to deal with these outcomes. Building on from what students learnt about the UK’s physical geography in year 7, students will learn how people in the UK interact with this landscape; past, present and future. They will learn the reasons behind the UK’s changing population and the social, economic and environmental impacts of this change. 

To finish KS3, students will develop their understanding of and ability to make geographical decisions. This synoptic unit will bring together the knowledge that students have learnt throughout year 7 and 8 in order to investigate real world issues.

Year 7: Map and Atlas skills; Dying Oceans; Tropical rainforests; Deserts; Development; UK Physical geography

Year 8: Geography of disease; Tectonics; Weather and climate; Easrth’s changing climate; UK Human geography; Decision making exercise.

KS4 Geography

Component 1- Global Geographical issues

Topic 1- Hazardous Earth

Topic 2- Development Dynamics

Topic 3- Challenges of an Urbanising World

Component 2- UK Geographical Issues

Topic 1- UK’s Evolving Physical Environment

Topic 2- UK’s Evolving Human Landscape

Topic 3- Geographical Investigations- Coastal change and conflict & Dynamic urban areas

Component 3- Making Geographical Decisions

Topic 1- People and the Biosphere

Topic 2- Forests Under Threat

Topic 3- Consuming Energy Resources

Performing Arts

Towers School is alive with the Arts

The Arts at Towers School will awaken the ambitions of all pupils; we will teach a curriculum that is knowledge-driven, that is diverse and that will make them appreciative of all art forms for the rest of their lives. All pupils have the right to explore each discipline of the Arts: to consider how humankind has found expression, to appreciate the beauty in crafted work or performance, to understand different cultures and behaviours, to have opinions on what has been created and to make their own artistic and imaginative choices. Pupils will go to the theatre, to galleries, museums and they will learn from practitioners and artists so that their experience of the arts is authentic. They will understand how all art is connected. They will feel inspired to be curious, encouraged to be kind and empowered to be brave.

Dance

Year 7: Technical skills; Choreographic skills; Jasmin Vardimon & Matthew Borne: Pinocchio & Swan Lake

Year 8: Performance Skills; Choreographic Skills; Union Dance Company & DV8: Dance Tek Warriors & Enter Achilles

Year 9: Motionhouse Dance Company: Charge; Akram Khan's 'Rush' & Shobana Jeyasingh's 'Faultline'; Skills sharing. Teach another student/group repertoire developed or in its original form.

Year 10 Practical: Dance work Infra practical work relating to the work; Dance work Artifical Things practical work relating to the work; Dance work Emancipation of expressionism practical work relating to the work; Dance work Shadows practical work relating to the dance work; Choreography and performance of the dance work shadows; Duo/ trio performance

Year 10 Theory: Infra intro 4 lessons, 6 and 12 mark questions & revisit A Linha Curva; Performance Skills (set phrases) & assessment; Emancipation of Expressionism intro 4 lessons & revisit Infra; Shadows Intro, revisit artificial things & rehearse for show; Revisit E of E, performance and choreographic skills; Performance Skills (set phrases FLUX) & assessment

Year 11: Performance Skills (set phrases FLUX and BREATHE) & assessment; Performance Skills (set phrase BREATHE) & Duo/trio performance & assessment; Choreographic skills & assessment; Revision

Drama

The Drama curriculum is based on the Drama Domains of Knowledge: Performance Skills; Genre, Style and Conventions; Design and Production; Devising; Evaluation of Performance

Key Concepts (not exhaustive)

Performance Skills

Use of…Voice, Tone, Intonation, Characterisation, Pace, Pause, Emphasis, Projection, Accent, Dialogue, Monologue, Duologue, Ensemble, Physicality, Body Language, Movement, Mime, Facial Expression, Gait, Posture, Physical Theatre, Realism, Chorus work, Multi-roling, Song, Dance, Improvisation, Audience Awareness.

Genre, Style and Conventions

Realism, Naturalism, Stanislavski, Ibsen, Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children, Theatre of the Absurd, Beckett, Existentialism, Absurdism, Pinter, Theatre of Cruelty, Artaud, Theatre of the Poor, Grotowski, Shakespeare, Elizabethan Comedy, Melodrama, Contemporary Performance, Scripted Performance, Devising, Tragedy, Comedy, Greek Theatre, Chorus, Direct Address, Fourth Wall, Multi-roling, Monologue, Song, Dance, Plot, Dialogue, Structure, Episodic, Cyclical, Improvisation.

Design and Production

Staging, Proscenium Arch, In the Round, Traverse, Promenade, Thrust, Site-Specific Performance, Design, Designer, Production Manager, Stage Manager, DSM, Costume, Set, Stage Furniture, Properties, Audience Awareness.

Devising

Exploration, Imagination, Improvisation, Directing, Application of Performance Skills, Application of Knowledge of Genre, Style and Conventions, Audience Awareness.

Evaluation of Performance

Self-Evaluation, Peer Evaluation, Critical Awareness, Professional Evaluation, Analytical Writing, Arts appreciation.

Year 7: Elizabethan Drama - A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Naturalism and Stanislavski- DNA; Brechtian Theatre

Year 8: Physical Theatre and Frantic Assembly- Curious Incident; Theatre of the Absurd; Stage Craft; 

Year 9: Arts Award Part A: participating in the arts; Arts Award Part B: evaluating the arts; Arts Award Part D: skills share

Year 10: Key Practitioners and Style- Theatre of the Absurd; Key Practitioners and Style- Theatre of the Poor/Theatre of Cruelty; Devising Unit; Blood Brothers

Year 11: Presenting and Performing Texts/Blood Brothers/ Evaluating Live Theatre

Music

Year 7:
Intro to Instruments of the orchestra, Peter and the Wolf/Young persons guide to the orchestra & Music notation.Circa 1936 (Peter and the Wolf) continues from KS1 and KS2 curriculum. Brief history of music. Introduces music theory;
Introduction to Garageband and Music genres. Introduces Music technology and develops recognition of genres from KS1 and KS2 curriculum. Identifying key instruments to genres. Composing a piece of music to given genre;
Introduction to Keyboard playing and composition. Develops composition skills taught in KS1 and KS2 and builds on notation skills taught in T1;
Silent Movies, special effects and advanced garageband skills. Builds on Skills learned in T2 using Garageband in different context/application;
Samba Drumming. Introduction of World music, rhythms and alternative forms of notation. From 1911 to present day. Geographical contribution from 2 continents. Develops skills from KS1, KS2 and T1 and T3. Learning basic and complex polyrhythms, large ensemble skills, teamwork, time keeping, musicians techniques and non-verbal cues for performances;
Signing/Singing. Singing is part of KS1 & KS2 curriculum therefore students should have a basic knowledge. This is developed by the introduction of vocal warm ups, the science behind the voice and how to perform. Students are then given the opportunity to perform in two or more contexts. New skill introduced is signing in Makaton (Circa 1970).

Year 8:
Advanced Notation, Advanced keyboard skills, learning to play Stand by me;
Skills developed from Y7, students learn advanced notation, advanced keyboard skills and apply those to a piece of written music;
Introduction to Logic Pro and automation skills. Skills developed from Y7, Students learn advanced Music technology (Logic Pro - Circa 1990) to build on skills already taught using Garageband;
Advanced keyboard and composition skills. Skills developed from Y7 basic composition and Keyboard skills, to advanced skills using more complicated rhythms;
Logic Pro Advanced sequencing skills. Students develop music sequencing skills learned in Y7 and Term 2 to advance music production and electronic compositions using a DAW;
African Drumming. Builds upon world music unit taught in Y7, students are introduced to new instruments, new rhythms whilst building on previous skills of dynamics, syncopation and call and response;
The role of the Sound Foley, Logic Pro, Silent Movies. Skills developed from Y7 and T2 & 4 of year 8. Students will apply new skills learning how to work as a sound engineer. Additionally will learn about the history of silent movies and technical advances (circa 1895 - current day)

Year 9
Part C KB - Research project. New unit - introducing research skills, will develop analytical skills required in Btec LV2;
Singing/signing Unit. Singing is part of KS1 & KS2 curriculum therefore students should have a basic knowledge. This is developed by the introduction of vocal warm ups, the science behind the voice and how to perform. Students are then given the opportunity to perform in two or more contexts. New skill introduced is signing in Makaton (Circa 1970).
Logic Pro/Music Technology - Students completing unit 7 of Btec. Students will build on logic pro skills taught this year and garageband skills taught last year. They will work on Unit 7 of Music Btec so that if they choose music next year they already have an understanding of the unit and how it works.
Keyboard Skills - Composition. Skills developed from Y7 and Y8, composition, notation and keyboard skills. Including using of dynamics, rhythms.

Year 10 and 11

Btec Music 

 

History

In History, the curriculum is based around the big ideas about humanity and society. We will consider: conflict; health; religion; imperialism; art; technology; architecture; the Church; power and authority; law, crime and punishment; economics; the law; rights and people; women; everyday life through the ages.

Year 7:

The Ancient Greeks; Anglo-Saxons; the Normans; the Crusades; The Renaissance; Henry VIII

and The Reformation.

Year 8

Elizabethan England; The Stuarts & the Civil War; The Restoration & the Georgians; The Industrial 

Revolution;Victorian social Reform; Empire and Slavery

Year 9 

The Cold War; USA & Civil Rights; Gangsters; The Middle East

Year 10

Health & Medicine bc 500- ; Germany in transition 1919 - 1933

Year 11

Development of the UK 1919-1990; Conflict & Upheaval 1331 - 1381

Science 

Purpose of Science Education

Science education is to empower through the sharing of knowledge and guide all students to ask the big questions; fostering curiosity in the world around us now and for the future.

How does Science at Towers serve this purpose?

“Be the Best Version of Your Cells”

Year 7: Safety - Bunsen burner licence; Cells; Structures and functions of the body systems; Reproduction; Particles; Reactions; Acids and Alkali; Forces; Light; Sound; Space.

Year 8: Health and Lifestyle; Ecosystems processes; Adaptation and Inheritance; Periodic table; Separation techniques; Metals and Acids; The Earth; Electricity and magnetism; Energy; Motion and Pressure; Retrieval of Year 7 topics.

Year 9: Key concepts in Biology; Cells and Control; Genetics; States of matter and Methods of Separating and Purifying Substances; Atomic structure; The Periodic table; Ionic bonding/Covalent bonding/Types of Substances; Motion and Forces; Waves; Retrieval of previous topics.

Year 10: Health Disease and Development of medicines; Plant structures and their functions; Acids and Alkali; Light and the eletromagnetic spectrum; Animal Co-ordination and Homeostasis; Exchange and Transport in Animals; Electricity and Circuits; Electrolytic Processes; Retrieval of previous topics.

Year 11: Exchange and transport / Ecosystems and material cycles; Groups in the periodic table, Rates of reaction, Heat exchanges in chemical reactions; Electricity; Magnetism and Electromagnetism; Retrieval of previous topics.

 KS4 COURSE LIST

Art & Photography

This is a broad course exploring a range of Art and Craft processes, new media and technologies. We will learn to understand how artists and designers use visual language and formal elements in their work; explore and understand the properties of a range of art and design materials; select, use and apply a range of 2D and 3D techniques, processes, media and material in art and design work and develop personal responses to artistic themes and design briefs.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Tory Collick - t.collick@towers.school

Business Studies

This qualification will give you the knowledge and skills needed to work in any business. It is qualification allowing you to apply your learning in real business situations. You will take responsibility for your own learning, and develop essential work-related skills, such as working to deadlines and presenting information effectively.This qualification in Business Studies enables students to:actively engage in the study of Business and Economics to develop as effective, independent students who are critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring mindsuse an enquiring, critical approach to distinguish facts and opinions, to build arguments and make informed judgements.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Kevin Murray - k.murray@towers.school

Dance

Dance is a powerful and expressive subject which encourages students to develop their creative, physical, emotional and intellectual capacity, whatever their previous experience in the subject. This specification recognises the role of dance in young people’s lives and students will study a range of dance styles. They can choose any style to perform and choreograph in, providing it meets the assessment criteria. The study of the anthology of professional works will develop their ability to critically appraise dances of different styles and cultural influences and provides a springboard for engaging practical tasks.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Phoebe Giles - p.giles@towers.school

Design Technology

The design technology curriculum engages learners in developing a wide range of skills from cooking to graphics, wood work and other crafts. This is an academic course which will give students a range of skills for life.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Tory Collick - t.collick@towers.school

Drama

Drama allows students to explore ideas and the world around them as well as expressing themselves creatively. It can also develop a range of skills which will support them throughout life including confidence, teamwork and reflection.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Becca Gardner - r.gardner@towers.school

English

English, as a subject, will inspire, motivate and challenge students. The course will develop students’ ability to read, understand and analyse a wide range of different texts covering the 19th, 20th and 21st century time periods as well as to write clearly, accurately and with style.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Katie Taylor - k.taylor@towers.school

Ethics

Ethics provides an opportunity for students to engage with a variety of topical questions around belief, values, meaning, purpose and truth. Students will be able to reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in light of what they have learnt. There will be a range of relevant and contemporary themes to study that will promote awareness of modern-world issues and engagement within the classroom.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Danielle Sillett - d.sillett@towers.school

Geography

Geography looks at the issues that are facing people in all parts of the world today, and asks how they might affect you as a citizen of tomorrow’s world – and how you might be able to influence events. Find out more about how people are using different environments, both your own and those in other parts of the world. Investigate issues of sustainability – will the Earth still be able to provide us with all the resources we take for granted now? Is global warming happening? How will it affect the Earth? Where should we build the new houses we need? Should the countryside be protected? What sort of jobs will there be in the future? Where will they be? What really causes ‘natural disasters’ like floods, earthquakes and volcanoes? How can people cope with them?

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Ian Sanderson - i.sanderson@towers.school

Health & Social Science

This course gives students an introduction to working in the Health and Social Care sector and provides an ideal foundation for students to progress to more advanced studies in Health and Social Care related careers.

Health and Social Care will equip students with sound, specialist knowledge as well as skills for everyday use.

Students will learn about communication, nutrition, life stages and development and much more.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Annette Stone - a.stone@towers.school

History

‘The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future’

History is a subject that allows students to develop an awareness of how the past has been represented, interpreted and accorded significance for different reasons and purposes. It empowers students to develop the ability to ask questions and to investigate them critically using a range of sources in their historical context.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Ian Sanderson - i.sanderson@towers.school

Mathematics

The mathematics curriculum aims to offer a broader and deeper mathematical content, delivered through a greater focus on problem-solving as preparation for the new GCSE.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Richard Coles - r.coles@towers.school

MFL - French 

Not only is a foreign language a passport to further study at university, and the discovery of the target culture and civilisation, but it opens up to the student a vast range of opportunities at all levels of ability, including enhanced job prospects.

Universities are giving out a very strong message about the importance of a foreign language. A capability in foreign languages is becoming more and more sought after in industry and the world of work.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Katie Taylor - k.taylor@towers.school

MFL - German 

Not only is a foreign language a passport to further study at university, and the discovery of the target culture and civilisation, but it opens up to the student a vast range of opportunities at all levels of ability, including enhanced job prospects.

Universities are giving out a very strong message about the importance of a foreign language. A capability in foreign languages is becoming more and more sought after in industry and the world of work.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Katie Taylor - k.taylor@towers.school

MFL - Spanish

Not only is a foreign language a passport to further study at university, and the discovery of the target culture and civilisation, but it opens up to the student a vast range of opportunities at all levels of ability, including enhanced job prospects.

Universities are giving out a very strong message about the importance of a foreign language. A capability in foreign languages is becoming more and more sought after in industry and the world of work.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Katie Taylor - k.taylor@towers.school

Music

In music, we focus on helping students to appreciate music, developing their own musical skills in playing, composing and even producing their own pieces. We study music from around the world, basic keyboard skills, advanced keyboard skills, the relation between music and industry and the utilisation of technology and computer software in composition and sound manipulation.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Becca Gardner - r.gardner@towers.school

PE & Sport 

Physical Education will equip students with the knowledge, understanding, skills and values they need to be able to develop and maintain their performance in physical activities. Students will also gain understanding of how physical activities benefit health, fitness and well-being.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Phoebe Giles - p.giles@towers.school

Science 

Science will enable students to:  develop scientific knowledge and understanding through Biology, Chemistry and Physics; develop understanding of processes and methods of science;  develop and learn to apply observational, practical, modelling, enquiry and problem-solving skills in the laboratory;  develop their ability to evaluate claims based on science through critical analysis of the methodology, evidence and conclusions, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Students will study the sciences in ways that help them to develop curiosity about the natural world; will give them an insight into how science works and that enable them to appreciate its relevance to their everyday lives.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Annette Stone - a.stone@towers.school

Sociology 

Students develop a wide range of knowledge and understanding about society, and how sociologists study and understand its structures, processes and issues. Sociology is exciting, interesting and relevant to students’ lives.

This subject encourages students to take a questioning approach to evidence and issues, thus developing their critical, evaluative skills.

 For details of how to obtain additional information on the curriculum please email 

Danielle Sillett - d.sillett@towers.school

  

Key Stage 3 - Lessons Per Week

 

Subject

Lesson Per Week

English

5

Maths

4

Science

3

Geography

2

History

2

PE

2

MFL

2

Music

1

Dance/Drama

1

DT/Art

2

Ethics/Citizenship

1

 

  

 

GCSE Grading System

For information on the new GCSE grading system, please click here

 

KS5:Year 12 & 13 Curriculum

Our Key Stage 5 offer comprises a number of potential Pathways.  Students can build a bespoke programme of study comprising A Levels, BTECs, Hospitality and Catering and Workability programmes.

We are very proud of being an accredited International Baccalaureate Careers Pathway school. 

Please click here to see the current 6th Form Subject Options.

 

 

 

Homework / Prep

Term Dates

Enrichment

Impact Reports